Accidentally Amazing

Why is it, that every time I make something that is absolutely to die for delicious, it’s completely on accident?

So this concoction was made solely so that I could get rid of some of the veggies that I had stocked in the fridge before they went bad. The end result was accidentally amazing.

Pasta – check. Asparagus, mushrooms, tomatoes, scallions, bell pepper and garlic, all chopped to about the same size, tossed in basil, rosemary, dill (lots of it), parsley, and a pinch of cayenne. Sauteed in garlic butter, then placed to the side. I saute spinach in garlic butter, then toss the rest of the veggies back in with it, because the spinach only takes a tenth of the time.

Before this all got started, I grilled up some sweet Italian sausage and got the water boiling. Let that drain before mixing it, otherwise it makes the veggies greasy. Oh! And don’t forget to pay the salt tax to the veggies either.

Toss everything together with cheese, and enjoy. Again and again…because I happily ate this three days in a row.

Find the recipe here.

Honey glazed porkchops

Porkchop

They looked so pretty on the plate, I couldn't help but take a picture.

We had these huge porkchops in the freezer, and it was just me and the roomie last night, so I thought I’d make something deliciously simple. What’s weird is that the idea just popped into my head when I pulled out the meat to defrost. But it worked oh so well.

I actually looked up a honey glaze, and that was as simple as I’d hoped. Mix together equal parts of brown sugar and honey, and heat them up. Sear the porkchops on both sides with salt and pepper. Put the porkchops in a baking dish, pour half the sugar mixture over the top and bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes. Flip and repeat.

I served mine with an asparagus stir-fry that I had in the freezer for a while, and then I added mushrooms, fresh spinach and balsamic vinegar. The vinegar didn’t give the veggies as full of a flavor as I had hoped, but it did give them a little tinge of flavor outside of their own crunchiness.